Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Explanations’ Category

The famous Abraham Lincoln had a favorite joke: “If we consider the tail of a lamb as a leg, how many legs would a lamb have?” — His answer: “Four, considering it one doesn’t make it one!”

Except….whatever God considers is just that!

God considered something for Abraham:

Abraham “believed the Lord, and God counted it to him as righteousness”. — Genesis 15:5-6

God considered Abraham righteous though Abraham had done and continued doing some pretty stinky things! God considering him righteousness was all that was required!

King David, too! He wrote:

“Blessed is he whose sin is covered unto whom the LORD imputeth not iniquity.” — Psalm 32:1-3a

The word imputeth means to consider. He wrote about those to whom the judge of the universe looks at and says, “Not Guilty!” That is a blessing!! Where do you get that?!

The Bible says

“It was not written for [Abraham’s] sake alone … but for our sake also, unto whom it shall be reckoned (considered), who believe on him that raised Jesus our Lord from the dead, who was delivered up for our trespasses, and was raised for our justification. — Romans 4:23-25

Joining our lives to Christ enters us in that consideration.

So, If We consider five (5) unrighteousness men in a room as righteous, how many righteous men are in the room? — Five, if they have given their lives to Christ, God considers it so!

— fritz

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

My children have a dad who loves them, and always will.

Read Full Post »

Funny how literary works and old sayings get stuck in the back of the mind and we accept wrong ideas without thinking!

James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938)


Benjamin Franklin said, “God helps those who help themselves”, and over the years most think that is in the Bible. John Wesley, the founder of Methodism says, “Cleanliness is next to godliness”, and we think that’s somewhere in the Bible, too.

James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) wrote a poem in 1922 called, “The Creation”,

AND God stepped out on space,
And He looked around and said,
“I’m lonely—
I’ll make me a world.”

And it filters down that God was somehow lonely — creating us to keep him company.

While it is a great poem (I presented it in high school drama) it is not very accurate. God was NOT lonely, did not create us from a sense of need, and has never depended on us for anything.

Why is that important? Because there is a difference between Love and Loneliness.

Loneliness focuses on self whereas Love is selfless. Ever known someone who “loved” you because they were lonely? How about someone who really loved you (regardless of what it did for them)? Notice a difference, did you?

God created through selfless love even though he knew it would cost him what was most dear (Rev. 3:8). He gave his eternal Son because he Loved (John 3:16) though most would reject (John 1:11). And throughout eternity he shall demonstrate that selfless love by pouring grace and blessing on those who enter the “secret place”1 (Ephesians 2:7)

No, God is complete within himself needing nothing but decided to share that love with the universe so they could enjoy it, too.

— fritz

1 See “A Secret Place” — April 22, 2012

Read Full Post »

“They that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength” — Isaiah 40:30b

Many Bible verses tell us to Wait on God but they don’t mean killing time. The word used, here, for “wait” is first found in Genesis,

“And God said, Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together in one place…” — Genesis 1:9

So the term means to pull together into one place or, figuratively, one focus.

We, also, see the same word in Job,

“…as an hireling looketh for the reward of his work, so am I…” — Job 7:2

The word includes actively, expectantly, looking for something — a reward in this case.

No, waiting on God isn’t killing time, it’s focused attentiveness with an expectation of blessing. It may involve time because, after all, God’s on his own schedule — but his schedule is right and the results are worth the wait.

God “will help us at the right time.” — Hebrews 4:16b (GW)

— fritz
Related Post: Lesson from a Trapeze Artist – April 18, 2012

Read Full Post »

Shake it off!

Paul gathered a pile of brushwood and, as he put it on the fire, a viper, driven out by the heat, fastened itself on his hand…But Paul shook the snake off into the fire and suffered no ill effects. The people expected him to swell up or suddenly fall dead; but after waiting a long time and seeing nothing unusual happen to him, they changed their minds and said he was a god. — Acts 28:3-6

The Apostle, Paul, writer of much of our New Testament, had a tough few years.

Unjustly imprisoned, shipwrecked, stranded on a remote island He was then bitten by a snake while trying to get warm. Everyone expected him to die.

His response — he just shook it off!

That’s what we have to do when things get difficult — shake it off.

Read Full Post »

The ancient religious artifacts of the Old Testament are actually object lessons for us, today.

The Tabernacle with its three sections is symbolic of the human body, soul, and spirit. The Ark of the Covenant symbolical of the believer’s “heart” — covered with Christ, sheltered under angelic protection, the place where we hear God’s voice.

The items inside the Ark of the Covenant are symbolical, too. A copy of the ten commandments was put there representing the law of God written in our hearts.

There was a second item inside the Ark of the Covenant – Aaron’s rod.

There’s a little history behind this artifact. Moses’ and Aaron’s authority was challenged so all the tribal leaders were commanded to put their walking sticks in God’s tent. God promised to reveal his choice. The very next day Aaron’s rod had not only grown leaves and flowers but yielded ripe almonds.

With the placement of Aaron’s rod inside the Ark of the Covenant Israel was reminded of God’s choice for High Priest and we are reminded of his chosen priesthood is inside of us. Like the ancient priests

  • We are not just tolerated but chosen;
  • God is our inheritance
  • God’s kingdom is our home
  • worship is our job.

“But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light” — 1st Peter 2:9

We do this, not by all becoming a pastor (though some may serve that way), but by serving Jesus in everything we do.

“And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord, and not unto men — Colossians 3:23

— fritz

1 – Hebrews 9:4, Exodus 25:10-20, Numbers 17:10

Read Full Post »

Ancient religious artifacts of the Old Testament are actually object lessons for us, today.

The Tabernacle is symbolical of the human body, soul, and spirit. The Ark of the Covenant symbolical of the believer’s “heart” — covered with Christ, sheltered under angelic protection, the place where we hear God’s voice.

The items inside the Ark of the Covenant are symbolical, too. A copy of the Law was put there representing the God’s law written in our hearts,  Aaron’s rod was placed inside symbolical of us being personally chosen by God for his service.

There was something else there, too — a jar of Manna.

The Israelites quickly ran out of food on their trek to the Promised Land so God sent what they called, “Manna”, meaning “What is it?”.   An important fact about Manna was its shelf life — one day.   Whatever wasn’t eaten that day went rancid with two exceptions — the manna gathered on Friday remained good through the Sabbath and the manna Moses put inside the Ark of the Covenant never went bad.

Jesus said his body was the true “Manna” from heaven. He said his followers would eat his flesh and drink his blood — well, that caused quite a stir!   They had a hard time with metaphors. That manna inside the Ark could represent Jesus in our hearts (we are all free to draw our own conclusions) but I think it primarily symbolizes God’s sustaining power through difficulties.

Anyone can make it through the easy stuff — but what about when life gets hard and lonely? Christ’s followers have some unique internal resources to sustain through trial and that sustaining presence of Jesus never goes rancid.

“Peace I leave with you,” Jesus said, “My peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.” (John 14:27)

When the natural resources of those around us play out and we continue to press into God’s grace with peace, that’s when opportunities arise to point to Jesus.

Sanctify the Lord God in your hearts: and be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you — 1st Peter 3:15

— fritz

1 – Hebrews 9:4, Exodus 25:10-20, Numbers 17:10

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: